Untitled
fuckyeahfluiddynamics:

This series of photos shows two plates with a thin layer of polymer-laced, viscoelastic liquid.  As the two plates are separated, complex instabilities form.  The lower section of each photograph shows the fluid on the plate, with finger-like Saffman-Taylor instabilities forming as air rushes in between the gap in the plates. As the separation increases, the polymers in the liquid stretch under the increased strain, inducing elastic stresses in the fluid that cause the formation of secondary structures. (Photo credit: R. Welsh, J. Bico, and G. McKinley)

fuckyeahfluiddynamics:

This series of photos shows two plates with a thin layer of polymer-laced, viscoelastic liquid.  As the two plates are separated, complex instabilities form.  The lower section of each photograph shows the fluid on the plate, with finger-like Saffman-Taylor instabilities forming as air rushes in between the gap in the plates. As the separation increases, the polymers in the liquid stretch under the increased strain, inducing elastic stresses in the fluid that cause the formation of secondary structures. (Photo credit: R. Welsh, J. Bico, and G. McKinley)

isomorphismes:

I used to think vectors were the same as points. They’re lists of numbers, right? Tuples. But … they’re not.

The way vector mathematics describes the forces of the world is to instantiate one linear-algebra at each point on the surface where a force is imparted.

Bam.

cozydark:

Star Clusters On a Collision Course |
Astronomers using data from NASA’s Hubble Space Telescope have caught two clusters full of massive stars that may be in the early stages of merging. The clusters are 170,000 light-years away in the Large Magellanic Cloud, a small satellite galaxy to our Milky Way.
What at first was thought to be only one cluster in the core of the massive star-forming region 30 Doradus (also known as the Tarantula Nebula) has been found to be a composite of two clusters that differ in age by about one million years.
The entire 30 Doradus complex has been an active star-forming region for 25 million years, and it is currently unknown how much longer this region can continue creating new stars. Smaller systems that merge into larger ones could help to explain the origin of some of the largest known star clusters.
Lead scientist Elena Sabbi of the Space Telescope Science Institute in Baltimore, Md., and her team began looking at the area while searching for runaway stars, fast-moving stars that have been kicked out of their stellar nurseries where they first formed. “Stars are supposed to form in clusters, but there are many young stars outside 30 Doradus that could not have formed where they are; they may have been ejected at very high velocity from 30 Doradus itself,” Sabbi said. continue reading

cozydark:

Star Clusters On a Collision Course |

Astronomers using data from NASA’s Hubble Space Telescope have caught two clusters full of massive stars that may be in the early stages of merging. The clusters are 170,000 light-years away in the Large Magellanic Cloud, a small satellite galaxy to our Milky Way.

What at first was thought to be only one cluster in the core of the massive star-forming region 30 Doradus (also known as the Tarantula Nebula) has been found to be a composite of two clusters that differ in age by about one million years.

The entire 30 Doradus complex has been an active star-forming region for 25 million years, and it is currently unknown how much longer this region can continue creating new stars. Smaller systems that merge into larger ones could help to explain the origin of some of the largest known star clusters.

Lead scientist Elena Sabbi of the Space Telescope Science Institute in Baltimore, Md., and her team began looking at the area while searching for runaway stars, fast-moving stars that have been kicked out of their stellar nurseries where they first formed. “Stars are supposed to form in clusters, but there are many young stars outside 30 Doradus that could not have formed where they are; they may have been ejected at very high velocity from 30 Doradus itself,” Sabbi said. continue reading

rhamphotheca:

Cosmic Spirograph
Bizarre and mysterious textures mark the planetary nebula IC 418, also known as the spirograph nebula. This nebula (which has nothing to do with planets at all and is in fact one of the last gasps of a dying star) is about 2,000 light-years away from Earth in the constellation Lepus.
(image: Credit: NASA/ESA & The Hubble Heritage Team STScI/AURA)
(via: Live Science)

rhamphotheca:

Cosmic Spirograph

Bizarre and mysterious textures mark the planetary nebula IC 418, also known as the spirograph nebula. This nebula (which has nothing to do with planets at all and is in fact one of the last gasps of a dying star) is about 2,000 light-years away from Earth in the constellation Lepus.

(image: Credit: NASA/ESA & The Hubble Heritage Team STScI/AURA)

(via: Live Science)

rhamphotheca:

The Hertzsprung–Russell diagram is a scatter graph of stars showing the relationship between the stars’ absolute magnitudes or luminosities versus their spectral types or classifications and effective temperatures. Hertzsprung–Russell diagrams are not pictures or maps of the locations of the stars. Rather, they plot each star on a graph measuring the star’s absolute magnitude or brightness against its temperature and color… (read more: Wikipedia)

rhamphotheca:

The Hertzsprung–Russell diagram is a scatter graph of stars showing the relationship between the stars’ absolute magnitudes or luminosities versus their spectral types or classifications and effective temperatures. Hertzsprung–Russell diagrams are not pictures or maps of the locations of the stars. Rather, they plot each star on a graph measuring the star’s absolute magnitude or brightness against its temperature and color… (read more: Wikipedia)

n-a-s-a:

The Cosmic Web of the Tarantula Nebula 
Credit & Copyright: Marcelo Salemme 

n-a-s-a:

The Cosmic Web of the Tarantula Nebula

Credit & Copyright: Marcelo Salemme 

n-a-s-a:

The Seagull Nebula
Image Credit & Copyright: Michael Sidonio

n-a-s-a:

The Seagull Nebula

Image Credit & Copyright: Michael Sidonio

mothernaturenetwork:

Hubble captures great photo of colliding star clustersThe galaxy clusters have lots of high-speed runaway stars around the area, likely ejected as large stars sunk into the center of a star cluster.

mothernaturenetwork:

Hubble captures great photo of colliding star clusters
The galaxy clusters have lots of high-speed runaway stars around the area, likely ejected as large stars sunk into the center of a star cluster.

n-a-s-a:

Spiral Galaxy NGC 4038 in Collision 
Image Credit: Data Collection: Hubble Legacy Archive; Processing: Danny Lee Russell 

n-a-s-a:

Spiral Galaxy NGC 4038 in Collision

Image Credit: Data Collection: Hubble Legacy Archive; Processing: Danny Lee Russell 

rhamphotheca:

Galaxy Cluster Stuns Scientists—Supermassive and Spewing Out Stars
“Roller coaster” discoveries throw astrophysicists for a loop.
by Andrew Fazekas
It seemed too good to be true: a superbright newfound galaxy cluster possibly more massive than any other known, forging fresh stars nearly a thousand times faster than normal.
But as many as ten telescopes have confirmed the strange case of the Phoenix Cluster. And despite the cluster’s rarity, scientists say, the findings may help explain the evolution of all such clusters.
“The discovery of this cluster was a bit of a roller coaster, since, with every new observation, we found something even more exciting,” said MIT astrophysicist Michael McDonald, lead author of the new study detailing the Phoenix findings, released by the journal Nature Wednesday…
(read more: National Geo)     (image: M. Weiss, CXC/NASA)

rhamphotheca:

Galaxy Cluster Stuns Scientists—Supermassive and Spewing Out Stars

“Roller coaster” discoveries throw astrophysicists for a loop.

by Andrew Fazekas

It seemed too good to be true: a superbright newfound galaxy cluster possibly more massive than any other known, forging fresh stars nearly a thousand times faster than normal.

But as many as ten telescopes have confirmed the strange case of the Phoenix Cluster. And despite the cluster’s rarity, scientists say, the findings may help explain the evolution of all such clusters.

“The discovery of this cluster was a bit of a roller coaster, since, with every new observation, we found something even more exciting,” said MIT astrophysicist Michael McDonald, lead author of the new study detailing the Phoenix findings, released by the journal Nature Wednesday…

(read more: National Geo)     (image: M. Weiss, CXC/NASA)